Ask Our Stylist – How to Choose the Right Overcoat

Ask Our Stylist – How to Choose the Right Overcoat

November 10, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Ask Our Stylist: What cuffs for what purpose?

 

Ask Our Stylist: What cuffs for what purpose?

There are many options available when designing your perfect dress shirt. We’ve already talked a bit about unique collar styles and how to use them, so let’s take a moment to discuss another often overlooked area: the cuffs. Like collars, your shirt cuffs can add subtle style to the overall cut of your ensemble. No doubt you’ve heard or at least seen the barrel cuff. This is your standard dress shirt cuff. The corners are squared and can be fastened with either one or two buttons. But what else is there? When is a French cuff appropriate? We’ve answered those questions and more below.

The French Cuff - Original Stitch French

French cuffs, or double cuffs, are characterized by their length. They tend to be double the size of barrel cuffs, allowing for the extra material to be folded back on itself and fastened with cuff links. Typically, French cuffs are formal by design. You probably think they’re strictly to be worn in situations that call for black tie attire, but you’d be wrong. Modern styles have incorporated the French cuff for casual affairs by cutting down the length and adding fun, festive, colors to the mix.

The Convertible Cuff - Original Stitch Square

The Convertible cuff can be viewed as a barrel and French hybrid. Depending on the look you’re going for it can be fastened via a button or cuff link. This dual functionality sees buttons set a little off to the side next to the buttonholes in order to accommodate either preference. When the corners are rounded, the convertible cuff gives off a dressed down, casual, vibe. The addition of cuff links kicks it into a more formal territory.

The Mitered Cuff - Original Stitch Big Angle

Mitered cuffs are one of our absolute favorites. It’s a simple cuff that works well whether you’re going into the office or attending a wedding. That’s because it is very much similar to the barrel cuff but with one distinct caveat: the 45-degree angle corners. This slanted seam offers an eye-catching option that can be fastened easily with one or two buttons.

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 

November 04, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Fall And Winter Dress Shirt Fabrics To Keep You Warm All Season Long

 

Fall And Winter Dress Shirt Fabrics To Keep You Warm All Season Long

Well, it’s that time of year again. The temperature is dropping, the leaves are changing, and you’re probably starting to realize that your regular spring and summer styles are just not cutting it. But don’t worry, Original Stitch is here to help. We’ll start with the basics: fabrics that’ll keep you warm and look good doing it.

Twills

Twill fabrics come in a variety of weaves. Herringbone, houndstooth, gabardine, and cavalry, are a few of the more popular ones. Typically, these fabrics are woven out of cotton or wool and are softer, thicker, and warmer than poplin – their finely spun cousin. The only downside to twill is that it tends to wrinkle easily, so more prep work may be needed to get your outfit in order and ready to wear.

Flannels

Flannels are the casual dress equivalent to sweatpants. They’re generally made of cotton, cotton/wool or cotton/cashmere blends. The key to this fabric’s heat retaining properties lie in the weight and size of yarn. They go heavy. They go big. And they go great with weekend activities spent in the brisk outdoors. Of course, flannels are super casual, but if you’re looking for something that plays both in and out of the office – then take a look at Brushed Cotton variants. 

Oxfords

Oxford weaves make fairly low maintenance fabrics. They stand up against wrinkles and bunching due to the sheer weight of the material itself. The heavy threads are set in a basket weave – which is more loosely knitted than, say, a Pinpoint weave – allowing for breathability in heated offices. Oxfords tend to work under jackets and blazers outdoors as well. 

Broadcloths

Broadcloths are by far the lightest fabrics in the bunch. They’re made using a dense weave that relies on the thickness, thread count, and type of yarn for heat retention. Cotton, silk, and linen are the three most common types of broadcloth, but for the purpose of keeping warm, you’re going to want the cotton adaptation. Broadcloth’s over-under weave pattern is tight-knit and durable, making it a fantastic weatherproof option that works well in more formal situations.

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts.

October 28, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
How to Take Your Measurements for a Great Fitting Dress Shirt

 

How to Take Your Measurements for a Great Fitting Dress Shirt

So you’ve decided to get a made-to-measure dress shirt? Congratulations are in order. Not only are custom-fit dress shirts more comfortable to wear, but they are also far more flattering than most anything you’ll pull directly from the shelf of a department store. We’ve compiled a list of easy to follow video instructions to put you on the right track.

What you’ll need:

  • A flexible cloth measuring tape
  • A partner for those hard to measure areas (optional)

Measuring the Neck

To measure the neck, wrap the tape measure around the back of your neck. Bring it around to the front, just under the Adam’s apple, and leave room for fit allowance. You can mark this by leaving a bit of space between the neck and where you close the tape measure’s loop. The extra give here ensures a comfortable fit while giving you control of just how relaxed around the throat the shirt should be. 

We recommend a 2-finger allowance.

Measuring for Long Sleeves

To measure for a long sleeve dress shirt, you’ll want to start in the middle of the neck. From there you'll measure down to the shoulder, and then from the shoulder to the middle of the back of your hand (or wherever you want the shirt cuff to stop). This is a 3-point measurement as demonstrated below. 

Chest Measurements

An accurate chest measurement is crucial to the comfort of your dress shirt. To give yourself the best fit, find the most prominent part of your chest – usually across the nipples – and start there. Wrap the tape measure around your back and be sure the end result is level all the way around. 

Waist Measurement

For the waist measurement, you'll want to find the area just above where your pant will sit. Wrap the tape measure around the circumference of your body and make sure the loop is level all the way around.

Measuring for Shirt Length

For the shirt length, you'll want to start in the middle of the neck, just under the collar. Run the tape measure down the spine and stop where you want the shirt to end. When in doubt, measure to the crease of the buttocks. 

Shoulder Measurements

A common misconception here is to measure across from one shoulder to the other in a straight line. But your body is built to include curves. So, to get a more accurate measurement, start at the top of one shoulder, measure up to the middle bottom of the neck, then from there you go back down to the other shoulder. Like so:

Hip Measurement

Find the widest part of your hips, usually at the hip bone, and wrap the tape measure around the circumference of your body. As with the chest and waist measurements, be sure to keep the tape level all the way through.

Biceps Measurement

To measure the bicep, put your arm straight out and then bend up to form a 90-degree angle at the elbow. Resist the urge to flex. Find the largest area of the bicep and measure the full circumference.

Wrist/Cuff Measurement

An accurate wrist measurement starts at the widest part of your wrist. Typically, this is the wrist bone. Wrap the tape measure around the circumference of your wrist. 

Note: If your wardrobe revolves around watches, as some do, be sure to note a watch allowance. Generally, this allowance is either .25, .5, or .75 inches but will depend on the size of your watch. Add this measurement to the side you wear the watch on. If you’re opting for a wider cuff, then this may not be a necessity at all.



 

October 21, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Unique Collar Styles and How to use them

 

Ask Our Stylist: Unique Collar Styles and How to Use Them

Menswear, especially where dress shirts are concerned, offers a myriad of variations for the fashionably inclined. From the cut, the fit, the cuffs and up to the collar, designing your perfect dress shirt with Original Stitch is as easy as knowing what you want. Our design tools allow users the opportunity to mix and match styles to create looks that stand out, blend in, or simply boost confidence. 

Take our unique collar styles, for instance. Here are the first four that should be on your radar.

  • The Stand Collar – An oft-overlooked, but super versatile, style that has its roots in Chinese culture. The stand collar can be surprisingly clean cut when styled to be. Best bet – go with no breast pocket and flat bottom hem for a long, lean, look. Long sleeves can be hiked up the forearms just a tad while short sleeves can be cuffed to add vintage appeal.  
  • The Round Button-Down Collar – A variant of the standard club collar. The round button-down may initially register as a bit off-putting due to the curved points, but don’t think about that too hard. All you need to know is that the round button-down looks great undone at the neck. Sure, it can pull off a skinny tie and add a bit of British flair to your ensemble like nobody’s business, but the open collar under a slim fit blazer lets just the right amount of air out of any formal attire. 
  • The Spread Collar – The spread collar is considered the default collar in European business wear. It looks like the regular collars you’re used to seeing on standard dress shirts, but it features a 5” to 6” spread from point to point. This extra space accommodates ties of a heavier material like cashmere and wool. 
  • The Cutaway Collar – This collar style is a rendition of the spread collar. The biggest difference here is that it goes wide – more than 6” from point to point – and can run as a straight line across the neck. The key to a collar this aggressive is to be bold when accessorizing. A large tie knot, like the Balthus knot, comes in handy here. 

When it’s all said and done, your style is unique to you. But if you’re looking to add a little something extra, then choosing a distinct collar style is about as easy a leap as you can make. And with this unique collar guide, you’ll have a leg up on how to pull them off effortlessly.

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts.

October 15, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Ask A Stylist – How and When to go Tucked VS. Untucked

 

When should a dress shirt be tucked in? When can you leave it untucked? These seem like simple questions with simple answers, but the truth is the rules are somewhat played fast and loose. You know those guys,  with untucked shirts at classically traditional events like weddings, making the men in suits feel a little overdressed? Possibly waltzing around movie theaters on a Sunday wearing a tucked in dress shirt and making everyone else wonder what they do for a living. They make it work.

The reason for that is simple: it isn’t the venue that regulates the notion of acceptable tucked versus untucked looks. It's the rules and learning how to properly bend them. So here is a list of do’s and don’ts to get you started.

The Rules:

• Hem: This is by far the one rule to follow. Normally, a formal dress shirt will have a rounded hem at the bottom. This feature usually runs about 2 inches long curving upwards from the center back to the side seems. Casual shirts, on the other hand, tend to be straight hemmed and hang about an inch all the way around. The focal point here is the length. If you want to break this rule, pay attention to the cut AND length of your jib—er, shirt.

• The Blazer: Wearing a blazer is a clear indication to tucking in your dress shirt. Blazers make most any outfit more formal by design. That’s not to say that these versatile jackets can’t be dressed down, in fact, that’s what they’re most known for these days. But they’re generally worn with at least one button fastened. Going untucked dress shirt and buttoned jacket is a no-no combination.

• Style of Pant: The type of pant worn with a dress shirt is equally important when discussing tucked versus untucked looks. Typically, pleated slacks and slim fit trousers accommodate the rounded, and hence, more formal hems.

How to break the rules:

• Hem: As discussed above, the rule here targets styles of hem. However, if you want to throw that out the window completely then by all means go for it. Length is where the money is anyway. Anything below your pant’s inseam is too long. Anything above the middle of the fly front is too short. But the zone in between is going to be your sweet spot.

The Sports Coat: Very near to the blazer is the sports coat. What’s the difference, you ask? Don’t worry, we’ve covered that too, but the most notable difference is sports coats were made to be the casual jacket pairing. This means you can pop them on over a short sleeved, untucked, dress shirt (or t-shirt for that matter) and leave the coat unbuttoned.

• Style of Pant: Jeans and chinos rule supreme where untucked shirts are concerned. Take into account the sports coat and hem length here and you can see how these pant styles can go from casual wear to a more formal setting with ease.

And there you have it. The basic rules – and how to break them – for wearing your dress shirt tucked versus untucked.

Separately, these points may seem like no brainers, but when put together comprehensively, you will start to spot more accurately what makes these looks work. At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts.

October 07, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Thread count on dress shirts

Everything You Need To Know About Thread Count & Dress Shirts

Let’s talk about thread count. It’s a subject that has made the jump from sheets to shirts, and anyone aware of the move knows that higher quality tends to follow closely behind. But why is that? What does thread count have to do with the make of your shirt? It’s pretty simple, really. Thread count describes the number of threads per square inch of a particular fabric. This directly correlates to the comfort and durability of the textiles produced. Higher thread count fibers are usually finer – the finer the thread, the softer the fabric and stronger the tensile strength. Here’s how it works.

  • Warp and Weft: These terms are used to define the vertical (warp) and horizontal (weft) run of threads woven together. The number of threads used to complete one square inch of fabric in this manner combines to become the thread count. For instance, 75 warp threads and 75 weft threads would result in a 150-thread count cloth.
  • Ply: No, we’re not talking toiletries, although the association is relevant. Ply refers to the number of yarns twisted together to produce a single thread. All things considered equal, single ply fabrics tend to be smoother and more delicate. Two ply fabrics are stronger and typically heavier.
  • Bias: Bias is how fabrics stretch in conjunction with warp and weft. Every piece of fabric has two biases perpendicular to each other. The goal is to create a little give by cutting along the bias direction. This technique, known as “bias cut”, is largely utilized in fashion to capitalize on the natural fluidity of the threads used, resulting in extra elasticity and flexibility all around.

  • Weave: Weave refers to the warp and weft patterns used to create textiles. For example, a plain weave is the alternate interlacing of warp threads over and under weft threads. Compare that with a hopsack weave, which adds a second warp and weft thread to the original, and the thread count can effectively be doubled, boosting strength and durability.




What Thread Count Should A Shirt Be?

This is completely subjective. It depends on the style of shirt and your goals for it. Let’s use standard T-shirts as a base. Generally, these tend to be on the lower end clocking in at around 40 to 50. They’re typically lightweight and have tons of stretch but not much in the way of elasticity. You know how that goes, they stretch around the neck or in the sleeves after moderate use, shrink in the wash, etc. A mid-range dress shirt will start at around 60 and top out in the 90s. Here is where you’ll find decent quality that can take a bit of a beating and still retain its shape. High quality dress-shirts range between 100 and 200. These are your softer, more supple, cloths. They have just enough stretch to fit comfortably, while superior elasticity allows them to snap back into fighting form time and time again.

The rule of thumb is simple: the higher the thread count, the higher the quality shirt. Usually. 

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. To get notified of new product launches and receive fashionable tips and tricks from our stylists sign up here.

October 02, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Ask Our Stylist: How to Style a Utility Shirt

Utility Shirts The Swiss Army Knife of Men’s Apparel

Utility clothing was introduced in the UK during World War II. They were meant to be cheap, affordable options for the public and act as a sort of wartime ration for folks who needed to stretch a shilling. Consumers were afraid these new government issued garments would be drab and uncomfortable, like military uniforms, but to everyone’s surprise they turned out to be malleable, fashionable, and more durable than what was currently on the market. So, what are utility shirts and how do they draw inspiration from their austere kin?

Camo Utility ShirtUtility Shirt from Original Stitch

The Scoop on Utility Shirts

Modern utility shirts are the Jack-of-all-trades for casual wear. You’ve no doubt seen and, very likely, admired them from afar. What’s not to love? They’re rugged, chambray-esque, dress shirts that feature canvas-like texture and myriad styling options. Typically, they were designed using denim, but today, like many trends that come from humble beginnings, the utility shirt has grown into a fashionable subgenre all its own. They’ve evolved to take tough-as-nails weaves like twill and jacquard and combine them with the resilient nature of tensile textiles like cotton to create versatile looks that make pairing easy.

Utility Shirt Camo Utility Shirt from Original Stitch

How To Style Utility Shirts

This is where things get fun. Utility shirts can literally be what you make of them. This is even more apt when you take into account our customization options. Generally speaking, utility shirts are meant to be casual, but with a little tweaking, men are incorporating these durable dress shirts into smart wardrobes fit for any contemporary office climate.

Here’s a quick rundown to get you started:

  • Collar Styles: The most casual, and easiest to wear unbuttoned, is the spread collar. This feature allows for maximum chill whether paired with jeans or chinos. Pull it together with rolled sleeves and a bit of stubble for a relaxed style with bite.

 

  • Breast Pockets: Opting for a single breast pocket is ideal and gives utility shirts more pairing options in terms of venue. However, don’t be afraid to go with double-breast pockets and short sleeves for warm weather weekend activities. If the double-breast is your intent, consider a button-down collar.

 

  • Color Options: Utility shirts have a tendency to be worn in urban settings with military styles. You’ve probably seen them in some shade of green. To play off of this, and blend in a bit better, choose colors that hover near without completely giving away its casual nature. Maroon, brown, and olive are good starter colors for this. White also works well to add a stylish, yet easygoing, vibe to office attire.


At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality utility shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts.

To get notified of new product launches and receive fashionable tips and tricks from our stylists sign up here.

September 23, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
What is a tie clip? How does a tie clip work?

What is a tie clip? How does a tie clip work? 

Let's keep this short and sweet.
Tie clips are a great functional accessory that helps keep your tie in place when you're moving about your day. Tie clips come in all shapes and sizes and they make really good gifts for anyone who owns at least one dress shirt. Though the concept of this item seems pretty straight forward, there are rules to help make sure that you are using them correctly and with intent.
Some housekeeping: Tie clips only make sense when you are wearing a classic, long tie. Bow ties and other neck accessories do not require a tie clip.
Additionally, clipping a tie clip to your shirt without any neck accessory not only looks odd but also serves no functional purpose. The goal is to learn the rules, master the rules, then tastefully break the rules to produce your own style (should you please).

Tie Clip Rules (Location and Placement):

  1. Tie clips should be clasped between your 3rd and 4th shirt buttons
  2. Your tie clip must clasp over the front of your tie, and under your shirt placket. (Note: Clipping the front of your tie to the back of your tie has no functional purpose and makes your tie look stiff)
  3. Do not wear a tie clip that is longer than the width of the tie you're wearing
At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 
To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
September 17, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Ask Our Stylist – How to Choose the Right Overcoat

Ask Our Stylist – How to Choose the Right Overcoat

 

Ask Our Stylist – How to Choose the Right Overcoat

It’s that time of year again. The fall leaves are giving way to plumes of chimney smoke, and your wardrobe could use a warm and toasty upgrade. There are a myriad of options out there to keep you comfy as the temperature dips. We’ve already discussed fabrics that work well for winter, so let’s take it a step further and bring overcoats into the mix. How does one style an overcoat to become a jack-of-all-trades garment? Let’s run through the basics.

Pick the right weight for your climate

The weight of an overcoat comes down to a few factors. The fabric you choose, the length of the overcoat, and whether it’s lined or not. These all play an important role in how much an overcoat will weigh. Obviously, lighter weights (roughly 17 ounces) are ideal for mildly cool weather, whereas something more substantial (between 19 and 20 ounces) works well for harsher climates like New York winters. Heavier fabrics are usually made using natural fibers like alpaca, cashmere, or wool.

                                                    

What length is the right length?

There is a bit of discrepancy here, so take these suggestions as a starting point. The general rule of thumb for a traditional overcoat is that it should hang just below the knee. However, there are variations – like the topcoat (trenches fall into this category) – which are lighter overcoats that stop at or above the knee. Then there is the duffel coat, a much heavier overcoat with a military heritage. These tend to hang around the mid-thigh area, have a hood, and come equipped with large, fashionable, toggle fastenings, or buttons. In either case, the sleeve length should be long enough to cover your shirt or suit’s cuffs, typically stopping just below the base of your thumbs to lock warm, body heated air in and keep the sting of winter out.

Single breast or double breast?

This, for most, simply comes down to style. Some prefer the sleek, modern look of a single-breasted overcoat. They’re slimming when closed, give your wardrobe a bit of breathing room when worn opened, and – as you may have guessed – have a single line of buttons on the face. Double-breasted overcoats are currently making a come back for the regality they lend to a wardrobe. They’re typically a bit boxier when worn closed, flows close (only leaving a small gap between fastening points) when worn opened, and have a two-button row down the front. Double-breasted overcoats also tend to be warmer due to the overlapping layers.

Any color is the new black

Again, this comes completely down to style and preference. Black is a perfectly suitable choice for an overcoat. They’re safe, dependable, versatile. They can be dressed up, paired down, and given the boot-cut jeans treatment. But they’re also expected. So, why not throw a little color onto the palette that is your wardrobe? Heather grey and navy blue are strong contenders for those who don’t want to stray too far away from the quiet dignity of black. But if you’re feeling adventurous might we suggest dabbling in the traditional fall colors – your maroons, olives, mustards, and browns. 

  

Starter options for everyday situations:

  • Testing out the Smart Office look: Simply pair the coat with a fitted suit, tailored dress shirt, and skinny tie. Easy.

  • Dressing up for date night: A nice roll-neck sweater and wool trousers are fashionable enough winter wear but adding an overcoat will liven up the ensemble without adding too much fanfare.

  • Pub crawling with friends: Your favorite raised knitted sweater and jeans go here. Opting for a crewneck offers the same casual vibe as the “tee shirt and jeans” style you may be more comfortable with, except it’s upgraded for winter. 

  • Brunch Sundays and day-tripping around the city: A close-knit sweater (think hoodie without the hood), casual jeans, and a simple scarf will fit right in with traversing urban jungles to blow off a little steam.


At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 

November 10, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Ask Our Stylist: What cuffs for what purpose?

Ask Our Stylist: What cuffs for what purpose?

 

Ask Our Stylist: What cuffs for what purpose?

There are many options available when designing your perfect dress shirt. We’ve already talked a bit about unique collar styles and how to use them, so let’s take a moment to discuss another often overlooked area: the cuffs. Like collars, your shirt cuffs can add subtle style to the overall cut of your ensemble. No doubt you’ve heard or at least seen the barrel cuff. This is your standard dress shirt cuff. The corners are squared and can be fastened with either one or two buttons. But what else is there? When is a French cuff appropriate? We’ve answered those questions and more below.

The French Cuff - Original Stitch French

French cuffs, or double cuffs, are characterized by their length. They tend to be double the size of barrel cuffs, allowing for the extra material to be folded back on itself and fastened with cuff links. Typically, French cuffs are formal by design. You probably think they’re strictly to be worn in situations that call for black tie attire, but you’d be wrong. Modern styles have incorporated the French cuff for casual affairs by cutting down the length and adding fun, festive, colors to the mix.

The Convertible Cuff - Original Stitch Square

The Convertible cuff can be viewed as a barrel and French hybrid. Depending on the look you’re going for it can be fastened via a button or cuff link. This dual functionality sees buttons set a little off to the side next to the buttonholes in order to accommodate either preference. When the corners are rounded, the convertible cuff gives off a dressed down, casual, vibe. The addition of cuff links kicks it into a more formal territory.

The Mitered Cuff - Original Stitch Big Angle

Mitered cuffs are one of our absolute favorites. It’s a simple cuff that works well whether you’re going into the office or attending a wedding. That’s because it is very much similar to the barrel cuff but with one distinct caveat: the 45-degree angle corners. This slanted seam offers an eye-catching option that can be fastened easily with one or two buttons.

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 

November 04, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Fall And Winter Dress Shirt Fabrics To Keep You Warm All Season Long

Fall And Winter Dress Shirt Fabrics To Keep You Warm All Season Long

 

Fall And Winter Dress Shirt Fabrics To Keep You Warm All Season Long

Well, it’s that time of year again. The temperature is dropping, the leaves are changing, and you’re probably starting to realize that your regular spring and summer styles are just not cutting it. But don’t worry, Original Stitch is here to help. We’ll start with the basics: fabrics that’ll keep you warm and look good doing it.

Twills

Twill fabrics come in a variety of weaves. Herringbone, houndstooth, gabardine, and cavalry, are a few of the more popular ones. Typically, these fabrics are woven out of cotton or wool and are softer, thicker, and warmer than poplin – their finely spun cousin. The only downside to twill is that it tends to wrinkle easily, so more prep work may be needed to get your outfit in order and ready to wear.

Flannels

Flannels are the casual dress equivalent to sweatpants. They’re generally made of cotton, cotton/wool or cotton/cashmere blends. The key to this fabric’s heat retaining properties lie in the weight and size of yarn. They go heavy. They go big. And they go great with weekend activities spent in the brisk outdoors. Of course, flannels are super casual, but if you’re looking for something that plays both in and out of the office – then take a look at Brushed Cotton variants. 

Oxfords

Oxford weaves make fairly low maintenance fabrics. They stand up against wrinkles and bunching due to the sheer weight of the material itself. The heavy threads are set in a basket weave – which is more loosely knitted than, say, a Pinpoint weave – allowing for breathability in heated offices. Oxfords tend to work under jackets and blazers outdoors as well. 

Broadcloths

Broadcloths are by far the lightest fabrics in the bunch. They’re made using a dense weave that relies on the thickness, thread count, and type of yarn for heat retention. Cotton, silk, and linen are the three most common types of broadcloth, but for the purpose of keeping warm, you’re going to want the cotton adaptation. Broadcloth’s over-under weave pattern is tight-knit and durable, making it a fantastic weatherproof option that works well in more formal situations.

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts.

October 28, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
How to Take Your Measurements for a Great Fitting Dress Shirt

How to Take Your Measurements for a Great Fitting Dress Shirt

 

How to Take Your Measurements for a Great Fitting Dress Shirt

So you’ve decided to get a made-to-measure dress shirt? Congratulations are in order. Not only are custom-fit dress shirts more comfortable to wear, but they are also far more flattering than most anything you’ll pull directly from the shelf of a department store. We’ve compiled a list of easy to follow video instructions to put you on the right track.

What you’ll need:

  • A flexible cloth measuring tape
  • A partner for those hard to measure areas (optional)

Measuring the Neck

To measure the neck, wrap the tape measure around the back of your neck. Bring it around to the front, just under the Adam’s apple, and leave room for fit allowance. You can mark this by leaving a bit of space between the neck and where you close the tape measure’s loop. The extra give here ensures a comfortable fit while giving you control of just how relaxed around the throat the shirt should be. 

We recommend a 2-finger allowance.

Measuring for Long Sleeves

To measure for a long sleeve dress shirt, you’ll want to start in the middle of the neck. From there you'll measure down to the shoulder, and then from the shoulder to the middle of the back of your hand (or wherever you want the shirt cuff to stop). This is a 3-point measurement as demonstrated below. 

Chest Measurements

An accurate chest measurement is crucial to the comfort of your dress shirt. To give yourself the best fit, find the most prominent part of your chest – usually across the nipples – and start there. Wrap the tape measure around your back and be sure the end result is level all the way around. 

Waist Measurement

For the waist measurement, you'll want to find the area just above where your pant will sit. Wrap the tape measure around the circumference of your body and make sure the loop is level all the way around.

Measuring for Shirt Length

For the shirt length, you'll want to start in the middle of the neck, just under the collar. Run the tape measure down the spine and stop where you want the shirt to end. When in doubt, measure to the crease of the buttocks. 

Shoulder Measurements

A common misconception here is to measure across from one shoulder to the other in a straight line. But your body is built to include curves. So, to get a more accurate measurement, start at the top of one shoulder, measure up to the middle bottom of the neck, then from there you go back down to the other shoulder. Like so:

Hip Measurement

Find the widest part of your hips, usually at the hip bone, and wrap the tape measure around the circumference of your body. As with the chest and waist measurements, be sure to keep the tape level all the way through.

Biceps Measurement

To measure the bicep, put your arm straight out and then bend up to form a 90-degree angle at the elbow. Resist the urge to flex. Find the largest area of the bicep and measure the full circumference.

Wrist/Cuff Measurement

An accurate wrist measurement starts at the widest part of your wrist. Typically, this is the wrist bone. Wrap the tape measure around the circumference of your wrist. 

Note: If your wardrobe revolves around watches, as some do, be sure to note a watch allowance. Generally, this allowance is either .25, .5, or .75 inches but will depend on the size of your watch. Add this measurement to the side you wear the watch on. If you’re opting for a wider cuff, then this may not be a necessity at all.



 

October 21, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Unique Collar Styles and How to use them

Unique Collar Styles and How to use them

 

Ask Our Stylist: Unique Collar Styles and How to Use Them

Menswear, especially where dress shirts are concerned, offers a myriad of variations for the fashionably inclined. From the cut, the fit, the cuffs and up to the collar, designing your perfect dress shirt with Original Stitch is as easy as knowing what you want. Our design tools allow users the opportunity to mix and match styles to create looks that stand out, blend in, or simply boost confidence. 

Take our unique collar styles, for instance. Here are the first four that should be on your radar.

  • The Stand Collar – An oft-overlooked, but super versatile, style that has its roots in Chinese culture. The stand collar can be surprisingly clean cut when styled to be. Best bet – go with no breast pocket and flat bottom hem for a long, lean, look. Long sleeves can be hiked up the forearms just a tad while short sleeves can be cuffed to add vintage appeal.  
  • The Round Button-Down Collar – A variant of the standard club collar. The round button-down may initially register as a bit off-putting due to the curved points, but don’t think about that too hard. All you need to know is that the round button-down looks great undone at the neck. Sure, it can pull off a skinny tie and add a bit of British flair to your ensemble like nobody’s business, but the open collar under a slim fit blazer lets just the right amount of air out of any formal attire. 
  • The Spread Collar – The spread collar is considered the default collar in European business wear. It looks like the regular collars you’re used to seeing on standard dress shirts, but it features a 5” to 6” spread from point to point. This extra space accommodates ties of a heavier material like cashmere and wool. 
  • The Cutaway Collar – This collar style is a rendition of the spread collar. The biggest difference here is that it goes wide – more than 6” from point to point – and can run as a straight line across the neck. The key to a collar this aggressive is to be bold when accessorizing. A large tie knot, like the Balthus knot, comes in handy here. 

When it’s all said and done, your style is unique to you. But if you’re looking to add a little something extra, then choosing a distinct collar style is about as easy a leap as you can make. And with this unique collar guide, you’ll have a leg up on how to pull them off effortlessly.

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts.

October 15, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Ask A Stylist – How and When to go Tucked VS. Untucked

Ask A Stylist – How and When to go Tucked VS. Untucked

 

When should a dress shirt be tucked in? When can you leave it untucked? These seem like simple questions with simple answers, but the truth is the rules are somewhat played fast and loose. You know those guys,  with untucked shirts at classically traditional events like weddings, making the men in suits feel a little overdressed? Possibly waltzing around movie theaters on a Sunday wearing a tucked in dress shirt and making everyone else wonder what they do for a living. They make it work.

The reason for that is simple: it isn’t the venue that regulates the notion of acceptable tucked versus untucked looks. It's the rules and learning how to properly bend them. So here is a list of do’s and don’ts to get you started.

The Rules:

• Hem: This is by far the one rule to follow. Normally, a formal dress shirt will have a rounded hem at the bottom. This feature usually runs about 2 inches long curving upwards from the center back to the side seems. Casual shirts, on the other hand, tend to be straight hemmed and hang about an inch all the way around. The focal point here is the length. If you want to break this rule, pay attention to the cut AND length of your jib—er, shirt.

• The Blazer: Wearing a blazer is a clear indication to tucking in your dress shirt. Blazers make most any outfit more formal by design. That’s not to say that these versatile jackets can’t be dressed down, in fact, that’s what they’re most known for these days. But they’re generally worn with at least one button fastened. Going untucked dress shirt and buttoned jacket is a no-no combination.

• Style of Pant: The type of pant worn with a dress shirt is equally important when discussing tucked versus untucked looks. Typically, pleated slacks and slim fit trousers accommodate the rounded, and hence, more formal hems.

How to break the rules:

• Hem: As discussed above, the rule here targets styles of hem. However, if you want to throw that out the window completely then by all means go for it. Length is where the money is anyway. Anything below your pant’s inseam is too long. Anything above the middle of the fly front is too short. But the zone in between is going to be your sweet spot.

The Sports Coat: Very near to the blazer is the sports coat. What’s the difference, you ask? Don’t worry, we’ve covered that too, but the most notable difference is sports coats were made to be the casual jacket pairing. This means you can pop them on over a short sleeved, untucked, dress shirt (or t-shirt for that matter) and leave the coat unbuttoned.

• Style of Pant: Jeans and chinos rule supreme where untucked shirts are concerned. Take into account the sports coat and hem length here and you can see how these pant styles can go from casual wear to a more formal setting with ease.

And there you have it. The basic rules – and how to break them – for wearing your dress shirt tucked versus untucked.

Separately, these points may seem like no brainers, but when put together comprehensively, you will start to spot more accurately what makes these looks work. At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts.

October 07, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Thread count on dress shirts

What is Thread Count and what Thread Count should my shirt be?

Everything You Need To Know About Thread Count & Dress Shirts

Let’s talk about thread count. It’s a subject that has made the jump from sheets to shirts, and anyone aware of the move knows that higher quality tends to follow closely behind. But why is that? What does thread count have to do with the make of your shirt? It’s pretty simple, really. Thread count describes the number of threads per square inch of a particular fabric. This directly correlates to the comfort and durability of the textiles produced. Higher thread count fibers are usually finer – the finer the thread, the softer the fabric and stronger the tensile strength. Here’s how it works.

  • Warp and Weft: These terms are used to define the vertical (warp) and horizontal (weft) run of threads woven together. The number of threads used to complete one square inch of fabric in this manner combines to become the thread count. For instance, 75 warp threads and 75 weft threads would result in a 150-thread count cloth.
  • Ply: No, we’re not talking toiletries, although the association is relevant. Ply refers to the number of yarns twisted together to produce a single thread. All things considered equal, single ply fabrics tend to be smoother and more delicate. Two ply fabrics are stronger and typically heavier.
  • Bias: Bias is how fabrics stretch in conjunction with warp and weft. Every piece of fabric has two biases perpendicular to each other. The goal is to create a little give by cutting along the bias direction. This technique, known as “bias cut”, is largely utilized in fashion to capitalize on the natural fluidity of the threads used, resulting in extra elasticity and flexibility all around.

  • Weave: Weave refers to the warp and weft patterns used to create textiles. For example, a plain weave is the alternate interlacing of warp threads over and under weft threads. Compare that with a hopsack weave, which adds a second warp and weft thread to the original, and the thread count can effectively be doubled, boosting strength and durability.




What Thread Count Should A Shirt Be?

This is completely subjective. It depends on the style of shirt and your goals for it. Let’s use standard T-shirts as a base. Generally, these tend to be on the lower end clocking in at around 40 to 50. They’re typically lightweight and have tons of stretch but not much in the way of elasticity. You know how that goes, they stretch around the neck or in the sleeves after moderate use, shrink in the wash, etc. A mid-range dress shirt will start at around 60 and top out in the 90s. Here is where you’ll find decent quality that can take a bit of a beating and still retain its shape. High quality dress-shirts range between 100 and 200. These are your softer, more supple, cloths. They have just enough stretch to fit comfortably, while superior elasticity allows them to snap back into fighting form time and time again.

The rule of thumb is simple: the higher the thread count, the higher the quality shirt. Usually. 

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. To get notified of new product launches and receive fashionable tips and tricks from our stylists sign up here.

October 02, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
Ask Our Stylist: How to Style a Utility Shirt

Ask Our Stylist: How to Style a Utility Shirt

Utility Shirts The Swiss Army Knife of Men’s Apparel

Utility clothing was introduced in the UK during World War II. They were meant to be cheap, affordable options for the public and act as a sort of wartime ration for folks who needed to stretch a shilling. Consumers were afraid these new government issued garments would be drab and uncomfortable, like military uniforms, but to everyone’s surprise they turned out to be malleable, fashionable, and more durable than what was currently on the market. So, what are utility shirts and how do they draw inspiration from their austere kin?

Camo Utility ShirtUtility Shirt from Original Stitch

The Scoop on Utility Shirts

Modern utility shirts are the Jack-of-all-trades for casual wear. You’ve no doubt seen and, very likely, admired them from afar. What’s not to love? They’re rugged, chambray-esque, dress shirts that feature canvas-like texture and myriad styling options. Typically, they were designed using denim, but today, like many trends that come from humble beginnings, the utility shirt has grown into a fashionable subgenre all its own. They’ve evolved to take tough-as-nails weaves like twill and jacquard and combine them with the resilient nature of tensile textiles like cotton to create versatile looks that make pairing easy.

Utility Shirt Camo Utility Shirt from Original Stitch

How To Style Utility Shirts

This is where things get fun. Utility shirts can literally be what you make of them. This is even more apt when you take into account our customization options. Generally speaking, utility shirts are meant to be casual, but with a little tweaking, men are incorporating these durable dress shirts into smart wardrobes fit for any contemporary office climate.

Here’s a quick rundown to get you started:

  • Collar Styles: The most casual, and easiest to wear unbuttoned, is the spread collar. This feature allows for maximum chill whether paired with jeans or chinos. Pull it together with rolled sleeves and a bit of stubble for a relaxed style with bite.

 

  • Breast Pockets: Opting for a single breast pocket is ideal and gives utility shirts more pairing options in terms of venue. However, don’t be afraid to go with double-breast pockets and short sleeves for warm weather weekend activities. If the double-breast is your intent, consider a button-down collar.

 

  • Color Options: Utility shirts have a tendency to be worn in urban settings with military styles. You’ve probably seen them in some shade of green. To play off of this, and blend in a bit better, choose colors that hover near without completely giving away its casual nature. Maroon, brown, and olive are good starter colors for this. White also works well to add a stylish, yet easygoing, vibe to office attire.


At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality utility shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts.

To get notified of new product launches and receive fashionable tips and tricks from our stylists sign up here.

September 23, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com
What is a tie clip? How does a tie clip work?

What is a tie clip? How does a tie clip work?

What is a tie clip? How does a tie clip work? 

Let's keep this short and sweet.
Tie clips are a great functional accessory that helps keep your tie in place when you're moving about your day. Tie clips come in all shapes and sizes and they make really good gifts for anyone who owns at least one dress shirt. Though the concept of this item seems pretty straight forward, there are rules to help make sure that you are using them correctly and with intent.
Some housekeeping: Tie clips only make sense when you are wearing a classic, long tie. Bow ties and other neck accessories do not require a tie clip.
Additionally, clipping a tie clip to your shirt without any neck accessory not only looks odd but also serves no functional purpose. The goal is to learn the rules, master the rules, then tastefully break the rules to produce your own style (should you please).

Tie Clip Rules (Location and Placement):

  1. Tie clips should be clasped between your 3rd and 4th shirt buttons
  2. Your tie clip must clasp over the front of your tie, and under your shirt placket. (Note: Clipping the front of your tie to the back of your tie has no functional purpose and makes your tie look stiff)
  3. Do not wear a tie clip that is longer than the width of the tie you're wearing
At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 
To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
September 17, 2020 by Marketing Originalstitch.com