The Do's and Don'ts of Undershirts

The Do's and Don'ts of Undershirts

September 09, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: What dress shirts are a "must own"?

Ask Our Stylist: What dress shirts are a "must own"?

Dress shirts are the foundation of a smart wardrobe. Though they are often overlooked in favor of suits, shoes, and accessories, developing your closets shirting selection will give you endless combinations for a myriad of ensemble types. Here are a few of the basics to help you begin building your staple shirting collection.

 

Solid White 

There is no single wardrobe item (aside from underwear) that is more multipurpose and iconic than the solid white dress shirt. This shirt can be worn in formal, semi-formal, and casual settings and easily elevate an ensemble from iffy to crispy in an instant. Because of its versatility, it gets a lot of use so we'd recommend having at least two in your rotation.

 

 

Fancy White

Your fancy white shirts are best used for your more formal soirees like cocktail events, dinner parties, and black-tie. Most often these shirts are constructed with a higher thread count for a brighter sheen (80/2 to 102/2) and woven using a more intricate weaving pattern like a herringbone, hairline stripe, or dobby. We suggest designing your fancy white shirt with a point collar and french cuffs.

 

Light Blue

Often viewed as the secondary "workhorse" shirt, light blue shirts are a great alternative to your solid white shirts and help introduce color into your shirting collection. We'd suggest doubling up on these shirts as they'll get a lot of wear. A simple poplin weave in a medium weight is great for professional settings, though we'd also suggest an alternate option in an oxford weave and button-down collar for slightly more casual affairs. Lighter shades of blue that are pastel in color are more versatile.

 

Lilac or Pink

The Lilac or Pink shirt both work in place of each other, and the choice between the two comes down to skin tone. You never want your clothes to wash you out so choosing a shirt color that has a visible contrast between your skin and the shirt cloth is ideal. Similar to your light blue dress shirts, these options help add color to your wardrobe and break up the monotony in your shirt rotation.

 

Casual

Casual can mean many things when determining the formality of a shirt. These things include shirt patterns, fabric types, sleeve length (short or long), collar style, and shirt length. Aside from the aforementioned shirting staples, casual shirts can and should always reflect your personality. 

 

 

Here are some tips to help you make the right casual shirt choice:

•The larger and bolder the pattern the more casual the shirt

•Button-down collars are the most casual shirt collar second only to the stand collar

•Short sleeves are always casual

•Straight hemlines are more casual than curved hemlines

•Heavier shirt cloths like flannels, canvas, and denim are typically viewed as more casual

September 02, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: When is it appropriate to unbutton your shirt collar?

Ask Our Stylist: When is it appropriate to unbutton your shirt collar?

Harking back to our conversation about proper business casual attire, we've learned that knowing your audience and location plays a huge roll in determining when not to make certain style decisions. These same rules apply when deciding to unbutton your collar and any additional buttons on your shirt placket. We will review some of the most pertinent scenarios and decisions for pulling off a cool unbuttoned look like the style maven that you are.

 

Office
In an office environment that observes traditional professional dress standards, you should keep all buttons on your shirt buttoned at all times. This includes collar point buttons on your button-down shirt collar. Typically, in these settings, it is inexcusable to be seen without a jacket, let alone a tie, and note that your shirt must be buttoned to the top while wearing a tie.

In more laidback work environments where a jacket and a tie are not required, it is safe to have your collar button unfastened. This simple "popping of the collar" button produces a relaxed and casual look that also makes you appear more approachable.

Night Out
Preserving a classy appearance is of utmost importance for a night out. When attending a dinner, it is safe to unbutton your collar button while simultaneously appearing smart and informal. It is considered to be in poor taste to undo any further buttons on your shirt placket, especially if there's a chance that you may sprinkle chest hair into your food.

When at a dance club or a bar, ordering a cocktail, you can both increase ventilation in your shirt and look good by unbuttoning a maximum of two buttons - your collar and the subsequent placket button. There are names for those who display undesirable behaviors such as unbuttoning three or more buttons on their shirts while attempting to attract a mate, and those names are not nice.

Daytime Outings
You make the rules here, and the temperature usually dictates those rules. For instance, if you're at a backyard BBQ and the sun is beaming on your crisp linen shirt, a maximum of two buttons (your collar and subsequent placket button) may be unfastened. This provides additional ventilation for your shirt and produces a classic summer look that has been mastered by every Hollywood star from Marlon Brando to Ryan Gosling.



At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 
To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
August 26, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: When is it appropriate to roll up sleeves on my dress shirt?

Ask our Stylist: When is it appropriate to roll up the sleeves on my dress shirt?

We've all been a victim to and perpetrator of old-world presentation politics. Sleeve rolling is another battleground. As with all aspects of getting dressed, our goal is to make sure you know the rules --when to uphold them and when to break them -- so that you always dress with intent

 

There are three instances where it makes sense to roll your sleeves:
•When your body temperature rises and you need more ventilation

•When you're conducting physical labor (and you don't want to stain your shirt)

•When you'd like to convey a relaxed attitude while maintaining some formality (business casual)

 

Ways To Roll:

Basic
This is the easiest and most intuitive way to roll sleeves. You simply unbutton your cuff and sleeve placket. Then, using your shirt cuff as a measurement, fold your cuff once and repeat until your cuff reaches your elbow. 

A trick to having a sharper version of this cuff is by unbuttoning your cuff and leaving the button on your sleeve placket fastened. You then fold your cuff in half and continue folding until your cuff until you reach your sleeve plack button. This will result in a leaner fold for a smart 3/4 length look.

Most Stylish
This rolling technique is recommended for shirts that have contrasting inside cuff lining. Start by rolling your sleeve, about 2 widths of the cuff, making sure that your cuff's edge sits just above your elbow. Flatten out any creases and then begin rolling from the bottom end of the sleeve. Continue rolling until your fold reaches the cuff's edge. Tug on the cuff's edge just a bit to show a quarter to half an inch of your cuff lining. Once complete, the bottom of your fold should sit just below your elbow.

Workmen's Roll
To give you the most arm exposure and to have the best chance at not getting your sleeves dirty during manual work, we present the Workman's roll. Lay your shirt down on a flat surface and begin folding your sleeve to a cuff's width. Repeat this about 4 times until your sleeve length reaches just above your elbow or until it reaches about 5 inches from your underarm. 

We suggest that you avoid rolling your sleeves when you are:
•Wearing a suit or sports jacket

•Wearing a tie

•Presenting to an unfamiliar audience or to an audience that observes traditional standards of dress

 

For when you're ready to complete your look with a clean-cut shirt made to your exact measurements, we recommend going with a wrinkle-resistant shirt! At Original Stitch, we offer a collection of 30 Easy Care fabrics that are notable for their wrinkle-resistant weaving technology. Our high-quality yarns were hand-selected from Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 

To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.

August 19, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: What is the best shirt cuff?

Ask Our Stylist: What is the best shirt cuff?

"Who cares about the cuff on your dress shirt? It's either buttoned or french cuffed, right?"

No. By now you should know that our goal is to make sure that you dress with intent, and that means that every detail matters. Shirt cuffs, like collar styles and cloth types, indicate the formality of a shirt. Here are the most common cuff styles and variants to help you make the right choice.

Fastening Styles:
Barrel
The barrel cuff gets its name from its cylindrical shape. It is the most common cuff shape and is the ideal choice for semi-formal ensembles. Barrel cuffs are usually fastened by one button and often have a second button parallel to first that allows the wearer to control the snugness of the cuff on their wrist.

French
French cuffs are the most formal cuff option. This style is double the length as a barrel cuff because it is meant to be folded back on itself and fastened with cuff links. Aside from weddings and black-tie affairs, this cuff style is a favorite for those who work in professional settings.

Convertible
The convertible cuff is Original Stitch's default cuff style. It is a barrel cuff that gives the wearer a variety of fastening options including the ability to add cufflinks for a dressier look. 

Cuff Shape Variants:
Rounded
The rounded cuff is most often a barrel cuff with a smooth, rounded edge. Typically regarded as a more casual style, the rounded cuff pairs well with buttoned-down collars and more relaxed cloth options.

Notched (Mitered)
The notched cuff (aka the mitered cuff) is most often a barrel cuff with the edge chopped at a 45-degree angle. Its sharp look makes it the choice cuff style for those in more professional settings.

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the cuff type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 
To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
August 13, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: What is Business Casual?

Ask Our Stylist: What is Business Casual?

Business casual is one of the most ambiguous concepts to master in your wardrobe because it means different things in different industries, companies and different events. In most places, business casual simply means “not a suit” -- but then what? We’ll break down the history and then look at some general industry segments to best understand the “where” and “how” to properly dress casually in a business environment.

History Lesson
Hawaiian shirts broke the seal on casual style in the workplace back in the 1960s. An organization called the Hawaiian Fashion Guild encouraged state legislators and businessmen in Hawaii during the late ’60s to adopt a more casual dress code on Fridays. This idea, of weekly casual work attire, followed suit (see what I did there?) with corporations on the mainland and shortly after the concept of “Casual Fridays” was born.
Fast forward to the late 1980s, Docker’s solidified their brand of office casual in the market by sending their “Guide To Casual Businesswear” to HR managers at some of the largest corporations of the time. This move sparked a revolution in office attire and by 1995 90% of corporations in the US were accepting of casual business attire in the workplace.
Today, office style rules are more relaxed as more industries are open to the idea of the workforce’s choice to express themselves through their attire. Having a good understanding of the appropriate styles and parameters for workplace attire can help with career growth and even landing a new job. 

Some basic rules to note:
• Know your audience
• The goal is to always look intentional, not flawless
• The darker the garment color the more formal the garment appears
• Darker tones up top appear more formal; lighter tones on top appear more casual
• Solids appear more formal than prints
• Tasteful prints help you look more approachable

White Collar Jobs
Most white-collar jobs, such as jobs in finance, government services or law firms, still adhere to a very strict dress code. Business casual in these spaces is more about changing the tone and pattern of a semi-formal look (suit) than changing the garments themselves. An easy go-to for a more office-appropriate business casual look in these workplaces is a classic navy wool blazer, an oxford or traditionally patterned shirt (i.e. stripes, checks, herringbone, and houndstooth) in a subtle color, a pair of light grey or tan trousers, and an oxblood derby, brogue, or loafer. Knits and more color tie options are encouraged.

Service Industry
For those in sales, hospitality, or any space where you are interacting with the public, knowing your audience is the first step to take when picking out your wardrobe. In these places, colloquialisms in your wardrobe are as essential as they are in your conversation so it's best that you dress the part. In this industry, jackets can be optional depending on the tone you wish to convey to your audience. However, should you opt for a no-jacket look, a nice vest (not a waistcoat) or sweater are recommended. As dress shirts in this industry are essential to maintaining a moderate level of formality, button-down shirts are ideal as they allow you to look put-together should you opt to not wear a tie. For your bottom half, chinos and loafers are a great tandem to convey comfort, ease and approachability. No one likes a pushy salesman! 

Start-Up
The tech boom of the late ‘90s and early 2000s brought with it the stigma of the sloppy start-up look. In this workplace, the goal is to look smart and comfortable without much effort. Blazers and sports coats are optional but in most start-up settings even frowned upon, but a nice overshirt, chore coat, or cardigan will keep your look together without feeling too stuffy. Again, dress shirts help convey a reasonable air of formality. Luckily, in this industry, anything with a collar presents itself as “dressed up” so have fun with expressive shirt prints, bold colors, and extraordinary button combinations. Your ensemble’s silhouette makes a huge difference here so feel free to tastefully pair your dress shirt with nice jeans (preferably with minimal distressing) and a low profile (white, black or beige) sneaker. 

For when you're ready to complete your look with a clean-cut shirt made to your exact measurements, we recommend going with a wrinkle-resistant shirt! At Original Stitch, we offer a collection of 30 Easy Care fabrics that are notable for their wrinkle-resistant weaving technology. Our high-quality yarns were hand-selected from Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 

To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
August 10, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: Can You Roll Up Slacks By Hand?

Ask Our Stylist: Can You Roll Up Slacks By Hand?

As a stylist, I get asked if it's okay to hand-roll slacks, the way you hand-roll jeans. The answer is not as straight forward as a yes or a no. Technically, yes you can, although I wouldn't recommend hand-rolling your slacks. I support tastefully broken style rules as long as the wearer errs on the side of tact and intent.

Hand-rolling your slacks like your jeans is a pretty difficult look to pull off, and here's why:

Denim is a dense and rigid fabric type. This means that denim is more likely to hold its shape when folded. Most jeans have a ½” hem that disappears into the fold when rolled twice, leaving the bottom of your jeans looking crisp and uniform. Tact and intent.

Your slacks are usually made with a lightweight, buoyant wool, or blended fabric. Slacks are much lighter compared to your denim jeans. This means that when rolled up, your slacks are less likely to hold their shape. Darn you, gravity! Additionally, a good pair of slacks has an extra 1-2” seam allowance in the hem for lengthening the bottom of your pants. Once rolled up, you’d theoretically be rolling that extra 1-2” to get a clean and uniform look at the bottom of your trousers, similarly to your jeans. However, gravity will most likely stand in your way of achieving an intentional, crips, clean look. 

If you want to roll up your slacks, I recommend having them professionally hemmed to your desired length instead. Whether it is jeans or slacks, the goal with the look of the length of your bottoms is to present themselves as intentional - as in “I meant for my pants to look like this.”

For when you're ready to complete your look with a clean-cut shirt made to your exact measurements, we recommend going with a wrinkle-resistant shirt! At Original Stitch, we offer a collection of 30 Easy Care fabrics that are notable for their wrinkle-resistant weaving technology. Our high-quality yarns were hand-selected from Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 

To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
July 30, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: Top 5 Collar Types

Ask Our Stylist: Top 5 Collar Styles

When it comes to your new customized button-up shirt, finding the right collar can seem like a daunting task.
But don’t make it hard on yourself. Here are some easily digestible tips that break down our top 5 collar styles to help you make the right selection for any occasion.
Forward Point Collar

Best Use Case:
With bowties, narrow ties, formal shirts, and guys with round faces.

What Makes It Unique:
There is very little space between the two collar points which means that these collars are not usually covered by jacket lapels (show off those collar points). 

Occasions:
Great for the traditionalist, minimalist, and any other occasion where dress shirts are accepted (everywhere).


Button Down Collar

Best Use Case:
Preppy looks (with a tie), students, non-tie wearers.

What Makes It Unique:
Two visible buttons on the collar point ends.

Occasions:
Best for more casual settings.


Cut Away Collar

Best Use Case:
Business environments, wider tie knots, wider neckties, men with large necks.

What Makes It Unique:
The collar points sit at a 45-degree angle.

 Occasions:
An alternative to the forward point, this collar works well in semi-formal spaces like your office, board room, or a nice dinner.


Round Collar


Best Use Case:
Oblong or heart-shaped faces, preppy looks, always with a tie (bow or regular).

What Makes It Unique:
Rounded collar points.

Occasions:
Works in casual and semi-formal settings



Best Use Case:
Outdoor activities, lounging and get-togethers

What Makes It Unique:
It’s a neckband with no collar.

Occasions:
Only in casual settings!

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 
To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
July 22, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: Is It Ok To Clash Prints and Patterns?

Ask Our Stylist: Is It Ok To Clash Prints and Patterns?


Whether you prefer bold or classic, the right pattern can elevate an outfit and make a serious impression. But what if you want to mix patterns into your business attire? As a stylist, my clients often ask me if it's appropriate to combine slacks and dress shirts with 2 distinct patterns.

I tell them that one of the hardest decisions they'll make regarding their wardrobe will always deal with the pairing and mixing of patterns. Showing that you know how to balance patterns and colors is the mark of a true sartorial maven.

Here's 2 ways you can make mixing patterns work for you:

Offset The Scale
Pair at different scales. One pattern should be subtle and understated, another more bold and visible, and lastly a larger pattern to tie the outfit together without overpowering the look altogether.

Mix The Media
Create a visual balance. Checks and plaids, as well as stripes and repeat prints (dots, paisleys, etc.), offset and complement each other.

When done correctly, there are print clashes that look intentional and like the right fashion wheels were turning during the compilation of the ensemble. With experimentation (usually) mastery will ensue. Ask your friends for feedback, retry what didn't work in different ways. Eventually you'll discover your perfect pattern clashing style.

At Original Stitch, we offer a collection of 30 Easy Care fabrics that are notable for their wrinkle-resistant weaving technology. Our high-quality yarns were hand-selected from Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 

To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
July 14, 2020 by Marina Carroll
The Do's and Don'ts of Undershirts

The Do's and Don'ts of Undershirts

The Do's and Don'ts of Undershirts

Underwear is a relatively new concept - that is, the underwear that we know today. Up until the end of the 19th century, a collared shirt was considered an undergarment. In those days, you’d never see much of a shirt other than the cuffs and collars. The vanity of having good hygiene is why detachable collars and cuffs were invented so that only the visible parts had to be washed consistently.  

Surprisingly, undergarments were not initially developed to protect the body from the elements nor to add another layer of insulation. A luxury of society's affluent few, undergarments protected the wearer’s skin from abrasive outerwear. The working class of the time was lucky to have a single shirt, as textiles were expensive, laborious, and precious goods. 

As with many developments in menswear, the concept of wearing an undershirt was made common during wartime. At the beginning of the 20th century, soldiers would often wear undergarments to protect their uniforms from dirt, and in hot climates, it was more comfortable to just wear the undershirt. After soldiers returned from WWII, sales of undershirts skyrocketed as soldiers wore "T-shirts" as their own as a form of outerwear

In the present day, undershirts are largely an optional garment and are purely based on the wearer's comfort level when adding an additional layer to the ensemble. If you do choose to wear an undershirt with your dress shirt, there are a few points to remember:

  • Wear an undershirt if you sweat profusely: One of the main functions of undershirts is its ability to guard your dress shirt and other layers against damage caused by sweat or your deodorant.
  • Undershirts help keep chest hair from poking through the shirt's surface. 
  • A T-Shirt is not an undershirt: undershirts are thin, formfitting garments that are lightweight and meant to be virtually invisible under your dress shirt
  • Your undershirt should match your skin tone: no, nude shapewear is not just a trademark of the Kardashians. The closer your undershirt is to your natural skin tone, the more invisible it will be under your dress shirt. HACK: When in doubt, choose a light, heathered grey undershirt vs a black or a white option.
  • Deep v-neck undershirts, never crew neck: there are few things more tasteless than an exposed undershirt popping out of a dress shirt. With a well-fitting deep v-neck undershirt, you can unbutton both your collar and subsequent button without exposing your undershirt.
September 09, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: What dress shirts are a "must own"?

Ask Our Stylist: What dress shirts are a "must own"?

Ask Our Stylist: What dress shirts are a "must own"?

Dress shirts are the foundation of a smart wardrobe. Though they are often overlooked in favor of suits, shoes, and accessories, developing your closets shirting selection will give you endless combinations for a myriad of ensemble types. Here are a few of the basics to help you begin building your staple shirting collection.

 

Solid White 

There is no single wardrobe item (aside from underwear) that is more multipurpose and iconic than the solid white dress shirt. This shirt can be worn in formal, semi-formal, and casual settings and easily elevate an ensemble from iffy to crispy in an instant. Because of its versatility, it gets a lot of use so we'd recommend having at least two in your rotation.

 

 

Fancy White

Your fancy white shirts are best used for your more formal soirees like cocktail events, dinner parties, and black-tie. Most often these shirts are constructed with a higher thread count for a brighter sheen (80/2 to 102/2) and woven using a more intricate weaving pattern like a herringbone, hairline stripe, or dobby. We suggest designing your fancy white shirt with a point collar and french cuffs.

 

Light Blue

Often viewed as the secondary "workhorse" shirt, light blue shirts are a great alternative to your solid white shirts and help introduce color into your shirting collection. We'd suggest doubling up on these shirts as they'll get a lot of wear. A simple poplin weave in a medium weight is great for professional settings, though we'd also suggest an alternate option in an oxford weave and button-down collar for slightly more casual affairs. Lighter shades of blue that are pastel in color are more versatile.

 

Lilac or Pink

The Lilac or Pink shirt both work in place of each other, and the choice between the two comes down to skin tone. You never want your clothes to wash you out so choosing a shirt color that has a visible contrast between your skin and the shirt cloth is ideal. Similar to your light blue dress shirts, these options help add color to your wardrobe and break up the monotony in your shirt rotation.

 

Casual

Casual can mean many things when determining the formality of a shirt. These things include shirt patterns, fabric types, sleeve length (short or long), collar style, and shirt length. Aside from the aforementioned shirting staples, casual shirts can and should always reflect your personality. 

 

 

Here are some tips to help you make the right casual shirt choice:

•The larger and bolder the pattern the more casual the shirt

•Button-down collars are the most casual shirt collar second only to the stand collar

•Short sleeves are always casual

•Straight hemlines are more casual than curved hemlines

•Heavier shirt cloths like flannels, canvas, and denim are typically viewed as more casual

September 02, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: When is it appropriate to unbutton your shirt collar?

Ask Our Stylist: When is it appropriate to unbutton your shirt collar?

Ask Our Stylist: When is it appropriate to unbutton your shirt collar?

Harking back to our conversation about proper business casual attire, we've learned that knowing your audience and location plays a huge roll in determining when not to make certain style decisions. These same rules apply when deciding to unbutton your collar and any additional buttons on your shirt placket. We will review some of the most pertinent scenarios and decisions for pulling off a cool unbuttoned look like the style maven that you are.

 

Office
In an office environment that observes traditional professional dress standards, you should keep all buttons on your shirt buttoned at all times. This includes collar point buttons on your button-down shirt collar. Typically, in these settings, it is inexcusable to be seen without a jacket, let alone a tie, and note that your shirt must be buttoned to the top while wearing a tie.

In more laidback work environments where a jacket and a tie are not required, it is safe to have your collar button unfastened. This simple "popping of the collar" button produces a relaxed and casual look that also makes you appear more approachable.

Night Out
Preserving a classy appearance is of utmost importance for a night out. When attending a dinner, it is safe to unbutton your collar button while simultaneously appearing smart and informal. It is considered to be in poor taste to undo any further buttons on your shirt placket, especially if there's a chance that you may sprinkle chest hair into your food.

When at a dance club or a bar, ordering a cocktail, you can both increase ventilation in your shirt and look good by unbuttoning a maximum of two buttons - your collar and the subsequent placket button. There are names for those who display undesirable behaviors such as unbuttoning three or more buttons on their shirts while attempting to attract a mate, and those names are not nice.

Daytime Outings
You make the rules here, and the temperature usually dictates those rules. For instance, if you're at a backyard BBQ and the sun is beaming on your crisp linen shirt, a maximum of two buttons (your collar and subsequent placket button) may be unfastened. This provides additional ventilation for your shirt and produces a classic summer look that has been mastered by every Hollywood star from Marlon Brando to Ryan Gosling.



At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 
To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
August 26, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: When is it appropriate to roll up sleeves on my dress shirt?

Ask Our Stylist: When is it appropriate to roll up sleeves on my dress shirt?

Ask our Stylist: When is it appropriate to roll up the sleeves on my dress shirt?

We've all been a victim to and perpetrator of old-world presentation politics. Sleeve rolling is another battleground. As with all aspects of getting dressed, our goal is to make sure you know the rules --when to uphold them and when to break them -- so that you always dress with intent

 

There are three instances where it makes sense to roll your sleeves:
•When your body temperature rises and you need more ventilation

•When you're conducting physical labor (and you don't want to stain your shirt)

•When you'd like to convey a relaxed attitude while maintaining some formality (business casual)

 

Ways To Roll:

Basic
This is the easiest and most intuitive way to roll sleeves. You simply unbutton your cuff and sleeve placket. Then, using your shirt cuff as a measurement, fold your cuff once and repeat until your cuff reaches your elbow. 

A trick to having a sharper version of this cuff is by unbuttoning your cuff and leaving the button on your sleeve placket fastened. You then fold your cuff in half and continue folding until your cuff until you reach your sleeve plack button. This will result in a leaner fold for a smart 3/4 length look.

Most Stylish
This rolling technique is recommended for shirts that have contrasting inside cuff lining. Start by rolling your sleeve, about 2 widths of the cuff, making sure that your cuff's edge sits just above your elbow. Flatten out any creases and then begin rolling from the bottom end of the sleeve. Continue rolling until your fold reaches the cuff's edge. Tug on the cuff's edge just a bit to show a quarter to half an inch of your cuff lining. Once complete, the bottom of your fold should sit just below your elbow.

Workmen's Roll
To give you the most arm exposure and to have the best chance at not getting your sleeves dirty during manual work, we present the Workman's roll. Lay your shirt down on a flat surface and begin folding your sleeve to a cuff's width. Repeat this about 4 times until your sleeve length reaches just above your elbow or until it reaches about 5 inches from your underarm. 

We suggest that you avoid rolling your sleeves when you are:
•Wearing a suit or sports jacket

•Wearing a tie

•Presenting to an unfamiliar audience or to an audience that observes traditional standards of dress

 

For when you're ready to complete your look with a clean-cut shirt made to your exact measurements, we recommend going with a wrinkle-resistant shirt! At Original Stitch, we offer a collection of 30 Easy Care fabrics that are notable for their wrinkle-resistant weaving technology. Our high-quality yarns were hand-selected from Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 

To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.

August 19, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: What is the best shirt cuff?

Ask Our Stylist: What is the best shirt cuff?

Ask Our Stylist: What is the best shirt cuff?

"Who cares about the cuff on your dress shirt? It's either buttoned or french cuffed, right?"

No. By now you should know that our goal is to make sure that you dress with intent, and that means that every detail matters. Shirt cuffs, like collar styles and cloth types, indicate the formality of a shirt. Here are the most common cuff styles and variants to help you make the right choice.

Fastening Styles:
Barrel
The barrel cuff gets its name from its cylindrical shape. It is the most common cuff shape and is the ideal choice for semi-formal ensembles. Barrel cuffs are usually fastened by one button and often have a second button parallel to first that allows the wearer to control the snugness of the cuff on their wrist.

French
French cuffs are the most formal cuff option. This style is double the length as a barrel cuff because it is meant to be folded back on itself and fastened with cuff links. Aside from weddings and black-tie affairs, this cuff style is a favorite for those who work in professional settings.

Convertible
The convertible cuff is Original Stitch's default cuff style. It is a barrel cuff that gives the wearer a variety of fastening options including the ability to add cufflinks for a dressier look. 

Cuff Shape Variants:
Rounded
The rounded cuff is most often a barrel cuff with a smooth, rounded edge. Typically regarded as a more casual style, the rounded cuff pairs well with buttoned-down collars and more relaxed cloth options.

Notched (Mitered)
The notched cuff (aka the mitered cuff) is most often a barrel cuff with the edge chopped at a 45-degree angle. Its sharp look makes it the choice cuff style for those in more professional settings.

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the cuff type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 
To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
August 13, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: What is Business Casual?

Ask Our Stylist: What is Business Casual?

Ask Our Stylist: What is Business Casual?

Business casual is one of the most ambiguous concepts to master in your wardrobe because it means different things in different industries, companies and different events. In most places, business casual simply means “not a suit” -- but then what? We’ll break down the history and then look at some general industry segments to best understand the “where” and “how” to properly dress casually in a business environment.

History Lesson
Hawaiian shirts broke the seal on casual style in the workplace back in the 1960s. An organization called the Hawaiian Fashion Guild encouraged state legislators and businessmen in Hawaii during the late ’60s to adopt a more casual dress code on Fridays. This idea, of weekly casual work attire, followed suit (see what I did there?) with corporations on the mainland and shortly after the concept of “Casual Fridays” was born.
Fast forward to the late 1980s, Docker’s solidified their brand of office casual in the market by sending their “Guide To Casual Businesswear” to HR managers at some of the largest corporations of the time. This move sparked a revolution in office attire and by 1995 90% of corporations in the US were accepting of casual business attire in the workplace.
Today, office style rules are more relaxed as more industries are open to the idea of the workforce’s choice to express themselves through their attire. Having a good understanding of the appropriate styles and parameters for workplace attire can help with career growth and even landing a new job. 

Some basic rules to note:
• Know your audience
• The goal is to always look intentional, not flawless
• The darker the garment color the more formal the garment appears
• Darker tones up top appear more formal; lighter tones on top appear more casual
• Solids appear more formal than prints
• Tasteful prints help you look more approachable

White Collar Jobs
Most white-collar jobs, such as jobs in finance, government services or law firms, still adhere to a very strict dress code. Business casual in these spaces is more about changing the tone and pattern of a semi-formal look (suit) than changing the garments themselves. An easy go-to for a more office-appropriate business casual look in these workplaces is a classic navy wool blazer, an oxford or traditionally patterned shirt (i.e. stripes, checks, herringbone, and houndstooth) in a subtle color, a pair of light grey or tan trousers, and an oxblood derby, brogue, or loafer. Knits and more color tie options are encouraged.

Service Industry
For those in sales, hospitality, or any space where you are interacting with the public, knowing your audience is the first step to take when picking out your wardrobe. In these places, colloquialisms in your wardrobe are as essential as they are in your conversation so it's best that you dress the part. In this industry, jackets can be optional depending on the tone you wish to convey to your audience. However, should you opt for a no-jacket look, a nice vest (not a waistcoat) or sweater are recommended. As dress shirts in this industry are essential to maintaining a moderate level of formality, button-down shirts are ideal as they allow you to look put-together should you opt to not wear a tie. For your bottom half, chinos and loafers are a great tandem to convey comfort, ease and approachability. No one likes a pushy salesman! 

Start-Up
The tech boom of the late ‘90s and early 2000s brought with it the stigma of the sloppy start-up look. In this workplace, the goal is to look smart and comfortable without much effort. Blazers and sports coats are optional but in most start-up settings even frowned upon, but a nice overshirt, chore coat, or cardigan will keep your look together without feeling too stuffy. Again, dress shirts help convey a reasonable air of formality. Luckily, in this industry, anything with a collar presents itself as “dressed up” so have fun with expressive shirt prints, bold colors, and extraordinary button combinations. Your ensemble’s silhouette makes a huge difference here so feel free to tastefully pair your dress shirt with nice jeans (preferably with minimal distressing) and a low profile (white, black or beige) sneaker. 

For when you're ready to complete your look with a clean-cut shirt made to your exact measurements, we recommend going with a wrinkle-resistant shirt! At Original Stitch, we offer a collection of 30 Easy Care fabrics that are notable for their wrinkle-resistant weaving technology. Our high-quality yarns were hand-selected from Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 

To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
August 10, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: Can You Roll Up Slacks By Hand?

Ask Our Stylist: Can You Roll Up Slacks By Hand?

Ask Our Stylist: Can You Roll Up Slacks By Hand?

As a stylist, I get asked if it's okay to hand-roll slacks, the way you hand-roll jeans. The answer is not as straight forward as a yes or a no. Technically, yes you can, although I wouldn't recommend hand-rolling your slacks. I support tastefully broken style rules as long as the wearer errs on the side of tact and intent.

Hand-rolling your slacks like your jeans is a pretty difficult look to pull off, and here's why:

Denim is a dense and rigid fabric type. This means that denim is more likely to hold its shape when folded. Most jeans have a ½” hem that disappears into the fold when rolled twice, leaving the bottom of your jeans looking crisp and uniform. Tact and intent.

Your slacks are usually made with a lightweight, buoyant wool, or blended fabric. Slacks are much lighter compared to your denim jeans. This means that when rolled up, your slacks are less likely to hold their shape. Darn you, gravity! Additionally, a good pair of slacks has an extra 1-2” seam allowance in the hem for lengthening the bottom of your pants. Once rolled up, you’d theoretically be rolling that extra 1-2” to get a clean and uniform look at the bottom of your trousers, similarly to your jeans. However, gravity will most likely stand in your way of achieving an intentional, crips, clean look. 

If you want to roll up your slacks, I recommend having them professionally hemmed to your desired length instead. Whether it is jeans or slacks, the goal with the look of the length of your bottoms is to present themselves as intentional - as in “I meant for my pants to look like this.”

For when you're ready to complete your look with a clean-cut shirt made to your exact measurements, we recommend going with a wrinkle-resistant shirt! At Original Stitch, we offer a collection of 30 Easy Care fabrics that are notable for their wrinkle-resistant weaving technology. Our high-quality yarns were hand-selected from Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 

To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
July 30, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: Top 5 Collar Types

Ask Our Stylist: Top 5 Collar Types

Ask Our Stylist: Top 5 Collar Styles

When it comes to your new customized button-up shirt, finding the right collar can seem like a daunting task.
But don’t make it hard on yourself. Here are some easily digestible tips that break down our top 5 collar styles to help you make the right selection for any occasion.
Forward Point Collar

Best Use Case:
With bowties, narrow ties, formal shirts, and guys with round faces.

What Makes It Unique:
There is very little space between the two collar points which means that these collars are not usually covered by jacket lapels (show off those collar points). 

Occasions:
Great for the traditionalist, minimalist, and any other occasion where dress shirts are accepted (everywhere).


Button Down Collar

Best Use Case:
Preppy looks (with a tie), students, non-tie wearers.

What Makes It Unique:
Two visible buttons on the collar point ends.

Occasions:
Best for more casual settings.


Cut Away Collar

Best Use Case:
Business environments, wider tie knots, wider neckties, men with large necks.

What Makes It Unique:
The collar points sit at a 45-degree angle.

 Occasions:
An alternative to the forward point, this collar works well in semi-formal spaces like your office, board room, or a nice dinner.


Round Collar


Best Use Case:
Oblong or heart-shaped faces, preppy looks, always with a tie (bow or regular).

What Makes It Unique:
Rounded collar points.

Occasions:
Works in casual and semi-formal settings



Best Use Case:
Outdoor activities, lounging and get-togethers

What Makes It Unique:
It’s a neckband with no collar.

Occasions:
Only in casual settings!

At Original Stitch, we offer a fully customizable collection (yes, even the collar type!) of premium quality shirts. Customers can create a shirt completely unique to them. Our high-quality yarns are hand-selected from and tailored in Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 
To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
July 22, 2020 by Marina Carroll
Ask Our Stylist: Is It Ok To Clash Prints and Patterns?

Ask Our Stylist: Is It Ok To Clash Prints and Patterns?

Ask Our Stylist: Is It Ok To Clash Prints and Patterns?


Whether you prefer bold or classic, the right pattern can elevate an outfit and make a serious impression. But what if you want to mix patterns into your business attire? As a stylist, my clients often ask me if it's appropriate to combine slacks and dress shirts with 2 distinct patterns.

I tell them that one of the hardest decisions they'll make regarding their wardrobe will always deal with the pairing and mixing of patterns. Showing that you know how to balance patterns and colors is the mark of a true sartorial maven.

Here's 2 ways you can make mixing patterns work for you:

Offset The Scale
Pair at different scales. One pattern should be subtle and understated, another more bold and visible, and lastly a larger pattern to tie the outfit together without overpowering the look altogether.

Mix The Media
Create a visual balance. Checks and plaids, as well as stripes and repeat prints (dots, paisleys, etc.), offset and complement each other.

When done correctly, there are print clashes that look intentional and like the right fashion wheels were turning during the compilation of the ensemble. With experimentation (usually) mastery will ensue. Ask your friends for feedback, retry what didn't work in different ways. Eventually you'll discover your perfect pattern clashing style.

At Original Stitch, we offer a collection of 30 Easy Care fabrics that are notable for their wrinkle-resistant weaving technology. Our high-quality yarns were hand-selected from Japan to be extra resistant to wear and tear while maintaining a softer feel than regular button-up shirts. 

To get notified of new product launches and receive style bits from our stylists, sign up here.
July 14, 2020 by Marina Carroll